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News
July 30, 2015

Cold climate research center and their videos!

Check out the videos (link here) by Cold Climate Housing (www.cchrc.org) on various research on ventilation in cold climate, saving energy, healthy homes, cold climate, indoor air quality, buildings in Alaska, thermal mass, etc.

Read more about Cold Climate Housing.

“Promoting and advancing the development of healthy, durable, and sustainable shelter for Alaskans and other circumpolar people.”

The Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) is an industry-based, nonprofit corporation created to facilitate the development, use, and testing of energy-efficient, durable, healthy, and cost-effective building technologies for people living in circumpolar regions around the globe.

Located in Fairbanks, Alaska, the Research Center was conceived and developed by members of the Alaska State Home Builders Association and represents more than 1,200 building industry firms and groups. Ninety percent of CCHRC’s charter members are general contractors from across the state. The Alaska professional building community is highly regarded as a national leader in energy-efficient housing design and construction, boasting the largest per capita builders’ association in the nation.

On September 23, 2006, the CCHRC Research and Testing Facility opened, on land leased from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The building contains research facilities and allows staff to work closely with students, faculty, and researchers at the university.

Alaska offers an excellent testing ground for cold-climate technologies and products. The geography provides the full range of climatic conditions a researcher would encounter across the northern United States — from the windy, cool, wet weather in Southeast Alaska to the very cold, snowy conditions across Alaska’s northern tier. In addition, Alaska’s cold season lasts for six months or longer, allowing ample time for researchers to conduct experiments and evaluate housing performance.