History of ventilation: Poor ventilation in the British Parliament in 1852, despite the large investments!
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December 16, 2015

History of ventilation: Poor ventilation in the British Parliament in 1852, despite the large investments!

After the experience of the House of temporary building was the goal of the new permanent parliament building would also have a good indoor climate. The contract was also this time to Reid, who now had to take on a vastly larger and more complex building with countless rooms, winding corridors and halls. Parliament building has two large towers, one of which houses the world famous clock ‘Big Ben’, used as a ventilation channels air into the building. The building’s central and a little lower tower was used as a ventilation duct to remove exhaust air. Reid felt that the fuel-powered ventilation must be installed to help along the way, then steam-powered fans were installed to blow into the air, while the air flow out of the building was still burning excessive. The system and its regulation was very advanced for its time, among other things, one could choose from any of the high towers that fresh air would be taken in from, depending on outside air as the least polluted at the moment.

Constant conflicts between the architect Charles Barry and David Reid meant that the building ventilation rate during the construction phase was divided into two separate systems. Experts condemned the system as “too advanced to work in practice,” why it was entirely about after just 14 months of operation. Parliament house indoor environment came to be dogged by complaints for decades.

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