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Enlightened thinking for BREEAM and passive house in Enterprise Centre Norwich!
News • Case studies
December 21, 2016

Enlightened thinking for BREEAM and passive house in Enterprise Centre Norwich!

Interesting article “Enlightened thinking” was published in the CIBSE Journal December 2016 about one of Swegon Air Academy Building Case Study: Enterprise Center Norwich. Read the full article here (link here).

BREEAM and passive house

The author describes how this building was designed as BREEAM and passive house and it become a unique demonstration centre. Over its lifetime the building´s embodied carbon is predicted to be one quarter that of a conventional structure.

Lighting in a conventional scheme would take up one third of the building´s energy consumption. In a passive house project, where heating is minimized, a conventional lighting scheme would be responsible for more than half of consumption and would not be plausible. The use of LED would afford us a 20% energy savings but they needed to look at lighting in a different way. Looking at supplying adequate lighting when and where it was needed.

Enterprise Centre Norwich

Find more information about this interesting building as one of Swegon Air Academy Building Case Studies (link here). Enterprise Centre in Norwich is an commercial building aiming to achieve BREEAM Outstanding and passive house certifications designted by Architype. The total area is 3,400 m² and the floor-to-ceiling height is 3,3 m to create sufficient volume to cope with temperature rise and ensure enough daylight. The building is built from 70% of bio-based materials and equipped with 480 m² of photovoltaics panels. The unusual or less specified materials have been incorporated in a building such as Thetford timber, Norfolk straw and heather, hemp. Sustainable low carbon features include mechanical ventilation with heat recovery, triple-glazed windows, photovoltaic panels and solar heating.