June 28, 2014
Sweden

Best Western in Årjäng

The Best Western in Årjäng, Sweden, was built in 2009 and can be considered as one of the buildings that have opened the way to the “Demand-Controlled Ventilation” (DCV) technology. The hotel has a conference centre, bowling and restaurant spaces, along with hotel rooms.

Ideally, the hotels are designed to work 24/7, i.e. 24 hours for seven days in a week. However the demand of the highest indoor air quality (IAQ), such as temperature, relative humidity, and CO2, arises when the people are in the hotel rooms, and that is mostly during evenings (late afternoons) and nights. So, if the rooms are ventilated 24 hours per day, independently if they are occupied or not, the energy consumption increase as well as the running cost. It is easy to think about how the operating costs could be reduced drastically if one can supply fresh and conditioned air only when it is strictly necessary, that is when people are in the rooms.

Besides, if one can consider that the hotel rooms are not occupied all the year, it is a good practice to use the DCV systems which have of course the aim to supply the exact airflow demand based on the immediate request; paying attention to the indoor quality which is one of the most essential characteristics for the hotel success.

A hotel hasn’t got the hotel rooms only, it has common spaces, and in these areas, the number of people constantly varied, so the constant air ventilation (CAV) systems are used the most. This usually includes the possibility to increase (boost) the airflow by a timer as well. The air quality reached in these shared spaces, and the low energy consumption usually does not justify the higher installation costs of the DCV systems if compared to the use and installation of the CAV systems.

Effects of different heat and cold generation scenario (Heat pump versus district heating and chiller) in a building with variable air volume versus demand-controlled ventilation systems.

Download, Effects of different heat and cold generation scenario (Heat pump versus district heating and chiller) in a building with variable air volume versus demand controlled ventilation systems Effects of different heat and cold generation scenario (Heat pump versus district heating and chiller) in a building with variable air volume versus demand-controlled ventilation systems (link here)

Article published in the REHVA Journal January 2016 by Francesco Errico, et. al. The objective is to verify the operation of an installed system in an OfficeRetail building located in Sweden. The focus is on comparing the energy-saving achievable with different ventilation systems with a focus on keeping or improving the indoor comfort condition. The systems taken into account are a constant air volume, a variable air volume and a demand-controlled ventilation system. The energy-saving is analysed considering two different heat & cold generation scenarios (heat pump versus district heating and chiller) to evaluate in terms of purchased energy and economy. The findings show the importance of continuous monitoring, the advantages of the choice of an advanced ventilation system and the importance of the chosen generation systems considering energy and economic costs.

Download, Master thesis on Demand controlled ventilation case study: on comfort and energy! Master thesis on Demand controlled ventilation case study: on comfort and energy (link here)

Download the full master thesis on demand-controlled ventilation by Francesco Errico.

Download, Master thesis on Demand controlled ventilation case study: on comfort and energy! Presentation on DCV case study: on comfort and energy (link here)

Download the presentation in PDF by Francesco Errico about Best Western in Årjäng.

Go to video, https://www.swegonairacademy.com/video/7540/ Swegon Air Academy research: “Best Western in Årjäng” (link here)

May 2015. Francesco Errico presents his master thesis about Best Western in Årjäng, mechanical ventilation system, monitoring and results regarding energy usage and indoor climate in the hotel rooms.

Swegon Air Academy webpage (link here)

Demand controlled ventilation in hotels. The Best Western hotel in Arjang, Sweden, can be considered as one of the buildings that have opened the way to the “Demand-Controlled Ventilation” (DCV) technology. Read more about this hotel Best Western in Årjäng by Francesco Errico.